1030652
Book:China's nuclear force modernization / Lyle J. Goldstein, editor, with Andrew S. Erickson.:2005. Book China's nuclear force modernization / Lyle J. Goldstein, editor, with Andrew S. Erickson.
China's nuclear force modernization / Lyle J. Goldstein, editor, with Andrew S. Erickson.
Author: Goldstein, Lyle
Associated Name: Erickson, Andrew S.
Associated Name: Naval War College (U.S.)
Publication year: 2005.
Language: English
Call Number V420.U54 N29 no.22 ; V420.N49 C45 2005
Media class: Book
Publisher: Newport, R.I. : Naval War College Press
Series title: Newport paper; no. 22
Extent: vi, 138 p. : chart, photos. ; 23 cm.
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Description:
Relations between Washington and Beijing improved swiftly in the wake of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, especially in comparison to the nadir that had been reached during the April 2001 EP-3 incident. This new tide of cooperation has included counterterrorism initiatives, regional partnership in such complex situations as Afghanistan and North Korea, and even some modest agreement on the importance of maintaining the status quo with respect to Taiwan's status. A strong foundation for this strategic cooperation is, of course, a burgeoning trade relationship, which received a further boost from China's entry into the World Trade Organization in November 2001. In 2003, trade between the United States and China amounted to $191.7 billion, up 23.2 percent from 2002. Remarkably, the total for 2003 was more than double the figure for 1998. The United States is China's second most important trading partner nation (Japan is first). Many reasonable strategists, observing this data, consider armed conflict between Washington and Beijing impossible, given the economic losses that both would incur almost immediately. Unfortunately, history has not been kind to the school of theorizing, known as commercial liberalism, which holds that economic interdependence prevents conflict. Indeed, the belligerent powers prior to both world wars had achieved impressive levels of economic interdependence.
1. China's nuclear command and control / Stephen Polk -- 2. China's undersea nuclear deterrent : will the U.S. Navy be ready? / Christopher McConnaughy -- 3. China's space development and nuclear strategy / Dominic DeScisciolo -- 4. Chinese BMD countermeasures : breaching America's great wall in space? / Andrew Erickson.
China's nuclear command and control -- China's undersea nuclear deterrent : will the U.S. Navy be ready? -- China's space development and nuclear strategy -- Chinese BMD countermeasures : breaching America's great wall in space?

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